A Safe Haven for Three Freshwater Invasive Alien Species in Tobago, Trinidad and Tobago

Ryan S. Mohammed

Abstract


Invasive  alien  species  are  non-native  species  that have been introduced either through self-introduction or by man and which have subsequently become  a threat to a country’s economy (e.g., agriculture and trade, infrastructure [e.g., water  supplies], human health, etc.). They may also impact biodiversity, habitat quality, and ecosystem  functions. Aquatic invasive alien species (IAS) have been documented in both Trinidad and Tobago  but generally are regarded as established or naturalised exotics, as their potential negative  impacts are not appreciat- ed fully. A site in Tobago is described, which provides a safe haven for aquatic IAS.

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References


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