Apparent lack of chytrid infection in northeast Tobago’s frogs

Authors

  • Robyn Thomson School of Life Sciences, Graham Kerr Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ
  • Paul A. Hoskisson Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 161 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G4 0RE
  • Sarah Brozio Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 161 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G4 0RE
  • J. Roger Downie School of Life Sciences, Graham Kerr Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ

Abstract

Six species of Tobago frogs (including the stream frog (Mannophryne olmonae) from 11 sites across the northeast of the island were tested in 2016 for the presence of the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. No chytrid was detected in any of the 176 samples (20-39 frogs per species). These results contrast with a 2006 survey which found chytrid in 25% of the M. olmonae individuals sampled, though none in smaller samples of four other species. Together with similar results from Trinidad, our findings indicate that the infection may have died out or be at a very low level in Trinidad and Tobago. However, there is a need to sample from the south of Tobago and from two threatened species not yet assessed.

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Published

2018-12-31

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Section

Research Papers